Sta Hungry Stay Foolish

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

A blog by Leon Oudejans
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Fast vs Slow thinking

The free and independent press

Worldwide we see lots of social change, including the search for a new equilibrium. Elections are a way of measuring such change. Hence, green and nationalistic parties are rising, while Christian and labour parties are declining. Liberals show a mixed result as they include two opposing fields. In countries with a dominant nationalistic agena, there is a lot of...

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The triune brain, multi-focus and multi-tasking

Most likely, you have read about the reptilian, limbic and/or neocortex parts of our brain. The triune brain concept was originally formulated by neuroscientist Paul D. MacLean in the 1960s. In 1990, it was detailed in his book The Triune Brain in Evolution which is still available. Essentially, these 3 brain parts represent 3 functions within...

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Fast vs Slow thinking (3)

Fast vs Slow thinking (3)

This week, I noticed a 27 November 2017 Big Think article, called "Your Identity Is Almost Entirely Based on Unconscious Brain Processes". The classic executive self-control (top-down) model on human consciousness is replaced by a new front-end / back-end (bottom-up) model. The distinction between conscious, subconscious, unconscious, and superconscious is replaced...

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Fast vs Slow thinking

Fast vs Slow thinking

This blog is the result of several seemingly unrelated articles: "Is technology making the world indecipherable?" (Aeon), and "In praise of slow thinking in the internet age" (Quartz). Latter article refers to another Quartz article: "Be like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett: If you’re not spending 5 hours per week learning, you’re being irresponsible". The terms fast...

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The decline in Common Knowledge (2)

The decline in Common Knowledge (2)

With hindsight, my 7 January blog on the decline in Common Knowledge felt like an introduction to this topic. Subsequently, I realised there is an interesting link with the 4 components of human intelligence: Knowledge (known knowns), Beliefs (known unknowns), Intuition (unknown knowns), and Imagination (unknown unknowns). My diagram below outlines this...

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Me time

One of the hardest things to ask for in a marriage or relationship is "me time". Strictly speaking, "me time" is "one's own personal time to be alone". More often the domestic debate is about leisure time and who enjoys more. A 2013 survey by the Pew Research Center concludes that American men enjoy 10-15% more leisure time than women. More seasoned couples may...

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