Sta Hungry Stay Foolish

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

A blog by Leon Oudejans
Tag:

Common Knowledge

Common sense is not for the common man (2)

Early 2015, I published my blog: Common sense is not for the common man. In 2021, its title seems more relevant than ever before. I was reminded of my 2015 blog following a sentence in someone else's blog post: "There seems to be nobody with common sense in governments anymore." While I seldom agree with this writer, I do agree with this observation. From 2018 to...

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How should you explain a pandemic?

People are looking for the meaning or purpose of the current coronavirus pandemic. Some claim that it's God's wrath onto humans. Others claim that people must now change in a certain direction (eg, more love, religion, and/or sustainability AND/OR less greed, pollution, travel, etc.). If and when you believe there is a Supreme Being (eg, Ahura Mazda,...

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Humans are experts in forgetting

A recent article in the Dutch Financial Times, mentioned this expression: humans are experts in forgetting. I must agree. I use two blog labels for my articles with a similar nature: the decline in Common Knowledge and History-Legends-Myths. There seems to be an (evolutionary?) advantage in forgetting. Why? The more ordinary life’s events are, the quicker we...

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The decline in Common Knowledge (7) – Astrology (3)

A recent article in science magazine Nautilus has a promising (sub) title: Why Astrology Matters. Seeing meaning in the stars is a vital part of the scientific story. The author was unable to answer my simple question: Why are we interested in astrology? After sending my 2018 blog to a friend, I realised that astrology is another example of the...

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The decline in Common Knowledge (6)

The decline in Common Knowledge (6)

Since several years, articles are claiming that the human intelligence quotient (IQ) is decreasing, after decades of increases in the previous century (eg, CNN, FD, NZZ, TIME). These increases were known as the Flynn effect and the reverse is called the anti-Flynn effect. Some articles have tried to verify that anti-Flynn effect (eg, NRC-2014,...

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The decline in Common Knowledge (5)

A recent NRC Future Affairs newsletter quoted the following from a recent article in The New Yorker, entitled "The hidden costs of automated thinking": "A world of knowledge without understanding becomes a world without discernible cause and effect, in which we grow dependent on our digital concierges to tell us what to do and when." Note: URL in quote added by LO....

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